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UASIN GISHU

This is how long HIV can go undetected in your body

Cornel Wawire
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HIV/AIDs testing tents. [Photo/gettyimages.com]

As many HIV/AIDs victims have always stressed, “HIV/AIDs is not a death warrant or a killer disease.” On Wednesday, a group of students from Eldoret National Polytechnic received some crucial lessons from HIV/AIDs counsellors who had paid a visit at their school. 

During a chat with the counsellors, they were surprised to know that a person can live with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) for even more than 10 years to have AIDs. AIDs is the final stage of HIV. Normally, the HIV virus can be detected in a person’s blood within 4-10 weeks. 

Early symptoms of HIV are not usually detected in some people. While others might experience problems such as; fever, headaches, sore throat, general muscle aches, diarrhoea or even weight loss. 

The students were argued to go for HIV/AIDs tests to know their status. More importantly, they were cautioned against involvement in sexual activities especially vaginal and anal sex without using protection. 

According to Ms Grace Mueni, a person is recommended to go for HIV test 3 months after engaging in unsafe sex with a new partner. She also noted that people who are at risk of getting the virus include homosexuals, those who often change partners and those sharing sharp objects in public places. 

With antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) in every hospital and health centre in the country, Ms Mueni noted that many people with the infection who use the drugs accordingly are living healthy lives. 

However, she argued the students to refrain from unprotected sex, as it is the major cause of HIV among the old and the young generation. 

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